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When Can I Come Back From: Talus Osteochondral Surgery

The talus is one of the three bones that form the ankle joint, along with the tibia and the fibula. Injuries to the cartilage and bone of the talus are likely more common than many people know, and these injuries are often the cause of ankle joint pain that persists long after a prior ankle sprain.

If the injury to the talus is significant it may require surgery. Surgery can range from minimally invasive arthroscopic surgery possibly with a technique called “microfracture” or more invasive resurfacing of the cartilage and underlying bone. Regardless of which type of surgery is done, one of the unfortunate aspects of cartilage surgery is that recovery takes a long time. It’s common to take 6 to 12 months to return to sports.

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Save Your Ankle With An Ankle Brace

We see a lot of ankle sprains in our clinical practices, and if they make their way to the orthopedic surgeon’s office it generally means it was a significant injury. Severe ankle sprains can take many weeks to properly heal, can be costly to treat, and can place the athlete at risk for future ankle sprains. What then can we do try reduce the number of ankle sprains, or reduce the severity of an ankle sprain if one does happen?

One simple and cost effective option is to wear a lace-up ankle brace. These braces are effective in stabilizing the ankle in side-to-side and landing movements (the type of movements typically risky for ankle sprains) but allow excellent movement for straight ahead activities such as sprinting and jumping.

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Start ACL Injury Prevention Programs When The Players Are Young

I’ve written and spoken about how much I believe in the value of the FIFA 11 program to reduce ACL and lower extremity injury rates, and make better soccer players. In fact the value of the FIFA 11 has been demonstrated in other sports too. I honestly can’t see why any coach wouldn’t implement this program. It’s part of the regular warmup you’d be doing anyway, and it’s better for your players. Please do it.

ACL tears tend to happen more frequently in teenagers rather than in younger players. Does that mean you should wait until the players are teenagers to start the FIFA 11? This recently published study suggests that the younger players will have greater improvements in body mechanics than the teenagers. The key study result: start the FIFA 11 program in the younger age groups.

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When Can I Play Again: Ankle Dislocation

By Dev Mishra, M.D. President, Sideline Sports Doc Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Key Points: An ankle dislocation is a severe and uncommon sports injury. In a dislocation, the relationship between the bones is completely disrupted Ankle dislocations typically require urgent evaluation in an emergency room for proper diagnosis and treatment Return…

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Ankle Sprain: When Can I Play Again

By Dev K. Mishra, M.D. President, Sideline Sports Doc Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Key Points: Recovery and return to play after ankle sprains will vary depending on the severity of the injury, and the injured athlete’s unique healing response Sport specific reconditioning after an ankle sprain often takes much longer than…

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Snowboarding Ankle Injuries: The Snowboarder’s Fracture

By Dev K. Mishra, M.D. President, Sideline Sports Doc Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Key Points: Snowboarders tend to get more ankle injuries than skiers, and skiers tend to get more knee injuries than snowboarders The “snowboarder’s fracture” is unique to ankle injuries in snowboarding A fracture of the “lateral process of…

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Revisiting Ice After Injury

By Dev K. Mishra, M.D. President, Sideline Sports Doc Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Key Points: RICE- Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation is widely recognized as the most appropriate immediate treatment for many sports injuries in the first hours to few days after injury The recommendation is mainly based on several decades…

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Simple Test For Return To Play After Ankle Sprains

By Dev K. Mishra, M.D. President, Sideline Sports Doc Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Key Points: Ankle sprains can be surprisingly tricky to recover from; a number of these will have ongoing issues needing therapy A simple way to test for readiness to return to play after an ankle injury is to…

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Foot and Ankle Injuries in Ballet

By Adam Bitterman DO and Simon Lee, MD Rush University Medical Center Foot and Ankle Section Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Foot and ankle injuries are extremely common amongst those participating in dance activities. Those impacting the lower extremity account for roughly 65-80% of all dancer injuries.. Currently, it is estimated that organized ballet dancing begins…

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Snowboarding Injuries to the Foot and Ankle

By Adam Bitterman, DO Fellow, Foot and Ankle Surgery Rush University Medical Center   and Johnny Lin, MD Assistant Professor, Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush Rush University Medical Center Key Points: Snowboarding is growing in popularity, especially amongst young people Lightweight boards with less rigid boots lead to faster speeds, with an increase in injury risk…

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