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Save Your Ankle With An Ankle Brace

We see a lot of ankle sprains in our clinical practices, and if they make their way to the orthopedic surgeon’s office it generally means it was a significant injury. Severe ankle sprains can take many weeks to properly heal, can be costly to treat, and can place the athlete at risk for future ankle sprains. What then can we do try reduce the number of ankle sprains, or reduce the severity of an ankle sprain if one does happen?

One simple and cost effective option is to wear a lace-up ankle brace. These braces are effective in stabilizing the ankle in side-to-side and landing movements (the type of movements typically risky for ankle sprains) but allow excellent movement for straight ahead activities such as sprinting and jumping.

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Stingers and Burners In Football

As football season rolls along we are seeing a fair number of injuries called “stingers”, also known as “burners”. The injury is named for the stinging or burning pain that spreads from the shoulder to the hand. This can feel like an electric shock down the arm. Stingers are fairly common injuries in collision sport athletes, and fortunately most of these injuries are temporary with rapid return to normal function. A stinger occurs when there is an injury to the network of nerves surrounding the neck and traveling to the shoulder, arm, and hand. In football we commonly see stingers when the neck is stretched to the side during a tackle. We will also see stingers occasionally when the side of the player’s head makes contact with the ground.

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Poor Helmet Fit Increases Concussion Risk In High School Football

High school football players with improperly fitted helmets are at greater risk for more severe concussions, according to this studypublished in the journal Sports Health. During a presentation of the study findings at the 2016 American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons annual meeting, senior study author Joseph Torg M.D. said: “This study suggests that incorrect helmet fit may be one variable that predisposes a football player to sustain a more severe concussion.”  Dr. Torg has been instrumental in developing many of the policies surrounding heads-up tackling techniques at all levels of tackle football.

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The World’s Most Watched Sports Physicals

By Dev Mishra, M.D. President, Sideline Sports Doc Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Key Points: The real purpose of the NFL Combine is to do preparticipation physical exams on the athletes entering the NFL draft Will Sam Darnold throw? Apparently not. Will a “sleeper” rise to the top of the charts based…

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Football Under Assault- But Good News About Heads Up Tackling

By Dev K. Mishra, M.D. President, Sideline Sports Doc Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Key Points: A recently published study in the Journal of the American Medical Association showed an alarmingly high percentage of brains of deceased football players had findings consistent with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a brain disorder felt to…

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Hip Pointers

By Dev K. Mishra, M.D. President, Sideline Sports Doc Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Key Points: The term “hip pointer” refers to a bruise of the muscles and soft tissue attachments to the top of the pelvis bone, near the area where your shorts or pants would be A hip pointer occurs…

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Spleen Injuries – Sneaky And Possibly Dangerous

By Dev K. Mishra, M.D. President, Sideline Sports Doc Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Key Points: The spleen is the most commonly injured abdominal organ during sports An enlarged spleen, such as from mononucleosis, places an athlete at additional risk of injury to the spleen Emergency treatment is critical to ensure the…

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Ivy League Bans Tackling At Football Practices: A Sign Of Things To Come?

By Dev K. Mishra, M.D. President, Sideline Sports Doc Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Key Points: The Ivy League took the extraordinary step to ban all player-to-player tacking at football practices. The news was reported this week by the New York Times The ban is designed to reduce the risk of concussion,…

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Ban Youth Tackle Football? Provocative NYT Article Is Worth A Read.

By Dev Mishra, M.D. President, Sideline Sports Doc Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Key Points: Author Gregg Easterbrook recently published an excellent thought-provoking article in which he stated the risks of brain injury might be significantly reduced by banning tackle football until at least age 12 One cited scientific study showed that…

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Data Can Reduce The Emotion Surrounding Concussion Policy

By Dev Mishra, M.D. President, Sideline Sports Doc Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Key Points: Good objective data can help guide decisions regarding concussion policy and can also help reduce the emotional intensity surrounding some of the decisions Objective data specific to young athletes is hard to come by but more research…

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