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Can You Trust Orthopedic Injury Information On The Internet?

I’m sure this is true everywhere in the country but it seems to be particularly true here in Silicon Valley where I practice: people naturally consult the Internet for information about their injuries. But can you actually trust what you’re reading?

When a patient comes to see me in the clinic I will frequently ask them whether they have consulted any Internet sources as this helps me get some context behind the knowledge about their condition. As long as the source of the information is good I welcome this kind of research as it tends to improve their recovery from the problem.

In this time of “fake news” which sites can you trust? The most important factor is to consider the source of the information.

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Pandora’s Box Of Gene Editing Is Now Open

I’ve written previously about a remarkable new technology called CRISPR and the promise it holds for leading to genetic cures for disease, and possibly gene editing for performance enhancement. With recent news that a Chinese scientist used the technique to produce genetically modified twin girls, we’ve entered a very real era of human genetic manipulation.

The question is whether scientists will proceed responsibly, or whether some rogue individuals will hurtle headlong into ethically questionable areas. Do we aim to cure previously incurable diseases, make designer babies, or find new ways for athletes to enhance performance without getting caught?

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Sports Medicine Weekly- A Podcast That Gets It Right

By Dev K. Mishra, M.D. President, Sideline Sports Doc Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Key Points: Sports Medicine Weekly is an excellent podcast for any athletes or others with an interest in sports health The show is hosted by Dr. Brian Cole of Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, and Steve Kashul, the radio…

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Are Wealthier Kids at Higher Risk for Sports Overuse Injuries?

There are a number of factors that appear to be correlated with an increased risk of youth sports overuse injuries:

Single sport specialization prior to the age of 14
Playing that single sport more than eight months out of the year
Practicing and playing a combined number of hours per week more than your age in years
Conversely it appears that free unstructured play rather than organized sport lowers a child’s risk of overuse injury. Appropriate periods of rest from sport as well as limitation in participation hours per week also appear to reduce injury risk. Is it possible that children from wealthier households are at higher risk of developing overuse injuries than children from poor households? One recently published study suggests that household wealth may be correlated with overuse injury risk.

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The World’s Most Watched Sports Physicals

By Dev Mishra, M.D. President, Sideline Sports Doc Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Key Points: The real purpose of the NFL Combine is to do preparticipation physical exams on the athletes entering the NFL draft Will Sam Darnold throw? Apparently not. Will a “sleeper” rise to the top of the charts based…

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Curling Takes Us To Another Doping Low

By Dev K. Mishra, M.D. President, Sideline Sports Doc Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Key Points: A Russian curler is accused of using a banned performance enhancing drug called Meldonium Performance enhancing substance use amongst high school aged athletes is reasonably common, with legal substances such as creatine, caffeine, and protein powders…

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Playing Through Injuries For The Championship Game

By Dev K. Mishra, M.D. President, Sideline Sports Doc Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Key Points: When there’s a championship game or other important contest, it can be tempting to simply try and play through an injury Some injuries could result in long term or permanent problems if you attempt to play…

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Hit Your New Year’s Goals

By Dev K. Mishra, M.D. President, Sideline Sports Doc Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Key Points: New Year’s goals can be achieved with the right set of guidelines to help you Pick a relatively small goal and go bigger when you succeed with the smaller one Use a visual key like a…

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Coming Back From: Knee Meniscus Surgery

By Dev K. Mishra, M.D. President, Sideline Sports Doc Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Key Points: Recovery is highly variable, but generally speaking most young athletes can return to sprinting, cutting, and jumping sports at about 6 weeks after partial meniscus removal surgery Generally speaking, most young athletes will return to sprinting,…

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The “10,000 Hour Rule” And Young Athletes

By Dev K. Mishra, M.D. President, Sideline Sports Doc Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Key Points: The “10,000 Hour Rule” is adapted from a classic 1993 publication from Anders Ericsson and is widely quoted a the number of hours one must deliberately practice in order to become an expert performer Implementing a…

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