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How Many Workouts Can You Miss And Still Stay Fit?

You’re working hard to compete successfully in your sport, or you’re working out regularly to stay fit. And every once in a while you’ll need to take time off from training. Maybe you’ve had an overuse injury and are taking time off to heal, or various life events invade your workout plans.

Many folks fret about the time off, feeling that they’ll rapidly lose all of those hard earned gains. How many days or weeks can you miss and still keep your level of fitness? It turns out that for most healthy adults in their 20s and 30s you can take 2 to 3 weeks off and still retain most of your strength and cardiovascular fitness. The amount of time off can be even longer if you are a teenager, and unfortunately it’s shorter if you are an older active adult.

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Two Great Reasons To Do ACL Injury Prevention Warmups

There is convincing evidence that major factors contributing to noncontact ACL tear risk include improper mechanics when landing from a jump or when rapidly changing direction. Training programs to reduce this risk have focused on improving landing mechanics and improving strength imbalances. Typically, these programs are incorporated into a team warm-up.

Two recently published scientific studies show that ACL injury prevention warm-up programs are very effective in reducing the risk of getting a noncontact ACL tear, and these programs lead to improved athletic performance. These are two really great reasons to utilize ACL injury prevention warm-ups for your sport.

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If You Have Knee Pain You Need BFR Training (Blood Flow Restriction)

Orthopedic surgeons will commonly recommend lower extremity strengthening for any of their patients with chronic painful conditions and almost everyone who’s had knee surgery. Strength gains and strength symmetry are necessary for proper function but individuals who have one of these conditions frequently report one common drawback: the exercises needed to increase muscle strength often lead to significant knee pain.

Blood flow restriction (BFR) training is becoming increasingly popular as a means of strengthening using low loads and without the same type of risk of increased joint pain found with traditional methods of strength training.

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Are Weighted Baseball Training Programs Safe And Effective?

Over the last several years baseball pitching at all levels from professionals to youth leagues has become increasingly dependent on pitch velocity and power.According to Pitch/FX data, the average fastball velocity in MLB has gone up each year since tracking began in 2008, from 90.9 MPH to 93.2 MPH in 2017. 

This intense focus on pitch velocity has resulted in the development of several speed enhancement programs.One of the most popular forms of speed enhancement programs utilizes underweight and overweight baseballs.In spite of the intense interest in this area there is very little high quality evidence that we can lean on. At this time we simply don’t have the answer to whether weighted baseball training programs are safe or effective.

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Getting Strong Without Getting Hurt

Many injured athletes and other patients I see need to get stronger in order to improve their function or performance. But for many of these folks getting strong through traditional resistance based strength training might lead to pain, or be dangerous after surgery. I wrote a few weeks back about a technique called blood flow restriction training, in which strength gains are made through very low load resistance. I believe there is great benefit for athletes with painful conditions, or rehab after surgery.

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The “10,000 Hour Rule” And Young Athletes

By Dev K. Mishra, M.D. President, Sideline Sports Doc Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Key Points: The “10,000 Hour Rule” is adapted from a classic 1993 publication from Anders Ericsson and is widely quoted a the number of hours one must deliberately practice in order to become an expert performer Implementing a…

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Athletic Trainers Are The Heroes Of Athletic Medicine

By Dev K. Mishra, M.D. President, Sideline Sports Doc Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Key Points: A skilled athletic trainer (ATC) is an invaluable part of the student-athlete’s sports injury care Schools with ATCs will consistently have healthier athletes and lower rates of recurring injuries than those without an ATC I’d strongly…

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The Shortest Workout

By Dev Mishra, M.D. President, Sideline Sports Doc Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Key Points:  High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) is a training technique that minimizes the amount of time training for fitness but seems to provide the maximum result When performed properly HIIT can be safe and effective for young athletes…

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Injury Prevention Warmup Programs Work- Use One!

By Dev K. Mishra, M.D. President, Sideline Sports Doc Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Key Points: Warmup based injury prevention programs such as the FIFA 11+ and others show a dramatic reduction in injury rates for young athletes The results are so impressive that I believe all youth sport organizations should recommend…

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??Injuries Are The Result Of Coaching Incompetence. Radio CaptainU Interviews Raymond Verheijen, Dutch soccer coach.

Summary By Dev K. Mishra, M.D. President, Sideline Sports Doc Clinical Assistant Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University Key Points: Verheijen is an outspoken critic of many soccer coaches and often places the blame for athletes? injuries on what he believes is improper player management and training from the coaches He believes many injuries are…

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