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If You Have Knee Pain You Need BFR Training (Blood Flow Restriction)

Orthopedic surgeons will commonly recommend lower extremity strengthening for any of their patients with chronic painful conditions and almost everyone who’s had knee surgery. Strength gains and strength symmetry are necessary for proper function but individuals who have one of these conditions frequently report one common drawback: the exercises needed to increase muscle strength often lead to significant knee pain.

Blood flow restriction (BFR) training is becoming increasingly popular as a means of strengthening using low loads and without the same type of risk of increased joint pain found with traditional methods of strength training.

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Can A Concussion Lead To An Ankle Sprain Or Knee Injury?

By now, most athletes understand that a concussion leads to changes in brain function. After a concussion an athlete may have symptoms such as headache and light sensitivity. Students may have difficulties with concentration in the classroom.

But what most athletes don’t know about is that a concussion also leads to changes in balance and peripheral vision. It turns out that those associated changes create an increased risk of injuries to the lower extremity, such as knee injuries or ankle sprains. In a recently published analysis, athletes with a concussion were 2x more likely to have a lower extremity injury in the weeks and months after a concussion.

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Artificial Turf vs. Grass: The Debate Continues

We’ve come a long way from the earliest versions of artificial turf, which were essentially large pieces of green plastic laid down over cement. The newest generations of artificial turf are radically better than the very first versions, yet the debate over which type of surface is best from a safety standpoint continues.

We’ll highlight this week some of the latest published research in this debate. In a large series specifically studying collegiate tackle football, it was determined that playing on artificial turf was an increased risk for PCL injuries in Division I players and for ACL injuries in Division II and Division III players.

While there are many strengths in this study, I would caution that the results are specific to American collegiate tackle football and may not be similar in other sports or in youth age groups.

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What Should You Expect After Surgery For A Kneecap Dislocation?

The kneecap (“patella”) can sometimes come completely out of its normal alignment. This is called a “dislocation” and if you’ve ever had one you know how incredibly painful this can be. If you have a single dislocation, we’ll typically recommend rehab without surgery. If you go on to have multiple dislocations, surgery is often recommended to stabilize the kneecap.

Results from surgery are reliable as far as stabilizing the kneecap, but return to sports results are widely variable. Some published medical data show return to sports at about 55% and others as high as 85%. Some of the key factors in successful return to sports are normalized function as measured on specific tests, and near-normal strength when compared to the normal knee. It may take more than 8 months after surgery to achieve these milestones.

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